GoGreen Portals

The GIC Sectors

Sustainable Tourism

scroll green30

Sustainable Aquaculture

scroll green30

Sea & Ocean Sustainability

scroll green30

Sustainable Aquaponics

scroll green30

Green Tech

scroll green30

Green Entrepreneurs

scroll green30

Sustainable Tourism

2017 international year of sustainable tourism for development

The UN declared 2017 International Year of Sustainable Tourism for Development
and several of the UN’s 17 global Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) relate to sustainable tourism.

Achieving sustainable tourism development is a continuous process requiring multi-directional participation from all stakeholders; from communities to business leaders, industry organizations and governmental agencies. The impact of sustainability needs to be monitored and measurable so that strategies can be implemented in the pursuit of shared goals.

The environmental and socio-economic factors of sustainable tourism development need to be managed; minimizing the negative impact of tourism on the environment and culture acting as a catalyst that protects the biodiversity of destinations whilst generating income alongside business and employment opportunities locally.

Funds garnered from tourist spending can be channeled into conservation projects such as habitat protection, through locally managed protected areas, safeguarding Nature’s assets for the future. Tourism is also an ideal vehicle to raise awareness and encourage positive environmental action through Responsible Travel.

GoGreen Incubation Center (GIC) enables businesses to integrate sustainability as an integral part of tourism development and management that runs through the corporate core rather than acting as an add-on. This is achieved through experiential travel connecting tourists to destinations in a meaningful and enjoyable way to raise appreciation, awareness and initiate action.

sdg goals icons 08 sector

SDG 8 – Tourism is one of the driving forces of global economic growth, accounting for 1 in 11 jobs worldwide.

sdg goals icons 12 sector

SDG 12 – Tourism that adopts sustainable consumption and production (SCP) can play a significant role in accelerating the global shift towards sustainability.

sdg goals icons 14 sector

SDG 14 – Coastal and maritime tourism, tourism’s biggest segments, particularly for Small Island Developing States (SIDS) relies on healthy marine ecosystems.

Sustainable Aquaculture

 

 

Sustainable aquaculture is fast-becoming a necessity as wild stocks of fish are depleted and impacted negatively due to threats to the health of seas and oceans. Innovation, research and development all play a crucial part in creating fish farms that provide a sustainable food source for the world’s growing population while protecting endangered species.

At the same time, land-based aquaculture sites take the pressure off the sea and oceans, reducing the effects of overfishing, pollution and damage to coral reefs and bringing stability to the delicate balance of marine ecosystems. Endangered fish species and bleached corals can then recover and be replenished to avoid the downward spiral of losing marine life forever and putting the survival of humanity at risk.

GIC supports the development of aquaculture sites that work in harmony with environmental goals while supporting communities through the creation of sustainable livelihoods and reliable food source. GIC provides support to projects and organizations to improve aquaculture performance in a sustainable way that increases efficiency and accelerates growth in targeted regions to meet demand.

Sustainable aquaculture relates to scientific, tech and production systems, from fish hatcheries to breeding and commercial supply as well as breeding, genetics, disease diagnosis and control plus nutrition and environmentally friendly feed.

sdg goals icons 14 sector

SDG 14 – There is currently not enough sustainable seafood to meet demand. The large scale business growth of fish farms and operations that use sustainable practices depends on investment, innovation and connectivity throughout the seafood value chain.

sdg goals icons 01 sector

SDG 1 – Skills development and the establishment of new aquaculture sites as well as training boost employment opportunities.

sdg goals icons 02 sector

SDG 2 – Over 1 billion people globally rely on fish as their primary source of protein and demand is rising as the world's population grows.

sdg goals icons 03 sector

SDG 3 – Best-practice aquaculture creates healthy fish and creates a sustainable food source that promotes a healthier diet.

sdg goals icons 06 sector

SDG 6 – Overfishing creates pollution and damage to valuable ecosystems while land-based aquaculture provides a food source produced in optimal clean water and quality conditions for both fresh- and seawater operations, which 95% water recycling.

sdg goals icons 08 sector

SDG 8 – Responsible Business in aquaculture is about looking after the health, safety and welfare conditions of the staff as well as the fish, boosting the local economy with wider and more diverse revenue streams.

sdg goals icons 12 sector

SDG 12 – Business and consumers are both responsible for ensuring that sustainable seafood demand is high and that supply is readily available.

 

Sustainable Seas & Oceans

 

Underwater Marine ecosystems are essential in maintaining the balance of life in the seas and oceans of the world. Marine life that is at risks, such as endangered species of fish and great swathes of coral reef globally, poses a threat to survival for the whole of humanity. Fish are the last animals hunted in the wild for food in the developed world and sustainability roads can lead to aquaculture and aquaponics for greener food sources; sustainable seafood for the future. Likewise, coral reef protection leads to essential regeneration and the general wellness of marine life and improved the water quality.

Traditional exploitation of seas and oceans is no longer viable and is beginning to give back less beneficial returns than ever before with costs rising in every respect, both financially and environmentally; threatening the livelihoods of coastal communities.

Sea and ocean sustainability is essential if marine life and the water quality is not to be changed beyond all recognition; with a tipping point that drags humanity under to a level; of no return. Scientific research, studies and development are making great strides in identifying damage and the causal impact, as well as what solutions are viable too.

GIC is initially concentrating on sea and ocean sustainability in Southeast Asia, with potential scalability for roll-outs throughout the region. Specialist oceanographers, marine scientists and sustainability experts combine their knowledge to create the most effective strategies for success.

sdg goals icons 14 sector

SDG 14 – Endangered fish species, global coral reef bleaching incident and destroyed marine ecosystems create an unhealthy marine environment that follows through the food chain.

sdg goals icons 01 sector

SDG 1 – With some 40% of the world's population living within 100 km of the coast, billions rely on the sustainability of coastal regions for their sustenance and livelihoods.

sdg goals icons 02 sector

SDG 2 – Only 10 of the big ocean fish remain, posing a real threat to those who rely primarily on food sources from the seas and oceans.

sdg goals icons 03 sector

SDG 3 – The seas and oceans of the world are interrelated and interdependent with the health of the Planet and wellness and survival of humanity.

sdg goals icons 06 sector

SDG 6 – Some 80% of marine pollution is caused by land-based activities such as run-off from manufacturing, tourism and agriculture as well as waste and sanitation issues which endanger marine life, including coral reefs.

sdg goals icons 08 sector

SDG 8 – Sustainable seas and oceans can boost coastal communities and the local economies through sustainable tourism development, providing sustainable work opportunities.

sdg goals icons 12 sector

SDG 12 – Sustainable seafood supply and demand, non-polluting industry, sustainable tourism as well as ethical consumption and Responsible Business combine in a way that positively impacts the seas and oceans.

Sustainable Aquaponics

 

The cornerstone of sustainability development, economically, socially and environmentally, is understanding and integrating the concept of interconnectedness. Aquaponics is a system that utilizes the natural symbiotic relationship between marine and plant life; creating a sustainable aquatic ecosystem.

With aquaponics, plants, which are often edible varieties such as lettuce, are grown within a system that feeds on nutrient-rich water created from aquaculture fish waste. The result is up to 90% less water use than traditional soil-based plants due to an efficient circulatory recycling system and the absence of artificial fertilizers, chemical pesticides, and antibiotics; meaning no harmful run-off on land and into water sources.

GIC recognizes the value of creating fish and plant food sources within an aquaponics set-up which result in faster growth and potentially bigger and healthier plants, year-round, with no waste. Time and finances are saved due to a lack of costly filtering processes and excess water costs.

Aquaponics cultivates plants and aquatic life without the need to add nutrients as water flows from aquaculture systems to the plants. The plants also filter the water which is then returned to the aquaculture site, creating a mutually beneficial environment. As well as human consumption, the plants can be grown for regeneration and to replenish lands and boost land-based ecosystems.

The operation of an aquaponics business requires expertise and skills yet the biggest challenge is when strategizing an aquaponics system is often providing support for the initial set-up rather than the issue of viability and ROIs.

sdg goals icons 14 sector

SDG 14 – Any system that alleviates the pressure to overfish and the ensuing damage this creates and enables the regeneration of marine life is positive and worthy of further investigation.

sdg goals icons 01 sector

SDG 1 – Opportunity combats poverty and sustainable food production that values resources can boost a community's ability to create a sustainable livelihood. 

sdg goals icons 02 sector

SDG 2 – Healthier, faster-growing nutrients and food production systems that feed into each other offer a viable solution to feed the world's growing population. 

sdg goals icons 03 sector

SDG 3 – Organic plants and healthy aquaculture fish, free from pollutants and disease, are beneficial to the healthy and well-being of consumers; promoting the concept of clean food and understanding the importance of knowing where the food source originate from.

sdg goals icons 06 sector

SDG 6 – Any reduction in run-offs from the use of fertilizers, pesticides and other pollutants promote cleaner seas and oceans while plants can filter water and feed this back to the aquaculture to create a clean and sanitary system.

sdg goals icons 08 sector

SDG 8 – Lack of clean water, lack of water resources and lack of financial capabilities can stunt economic growth while developing sustainability industries can create healthy working environments with ROI potential. 

sdg goals icons 12 sector

SDG 12 – Aquaponics is a demonstration of the irrelation between plants and freshwater fish and other species. It can be further expanded to relate to the relationship between consumers and producers which are mutually reliant and involves responsibility and accountability.

Green Tech and Green Entrepreneurs

Not a member yet? Register